Long term survival with thoracoscopic versus open lobectomy: propensity matched comparative analysis using SEER-Medicare database

Journal BMJ
Authors
Subroto Paul,  Abby J Isaacs,  Tom Treasure, Nasser K Altorki, Art Sedrakyan
Year Published 2014
Link to Publication

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare long term survival after minimally invasive lobectomy and thoracotomy lobectomy.

DESIGN:

Propensity matched analysis.

SETTING:

Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database.

PARTICIPANTS:

All patients with lung cancer from 2007 to 2009 undergoing lobectomy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Influence of less invasive thoracoscopic surgery on overall survival, disease-free survival, and cancer specific survival.

RESULTS:

From 2007 to 2009, 6008 patients undergoing lobectomy were identified (n=4715 (78%) thoracotomy). The median age of the entire cohort was 74 (interquartile range 70-78) years. The median length of follow-up for entire group was 40 months. In a matched analysis of 1195 patients in each treatment category, no statistical differences in three year overall survival, disease-free survival, or cancer specific survival were found between the groups (overall survival: 70.6% v 68.1%, P=0.55; disease-free survival: 86.2% v 85.4%, P=0.46; cancer specific survival: 92% v 89.5%, P=0.05).

CONCLUSION:

This propensity matched analysis showed that patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy had similar overall, cancer specific, and disease-free survival compared with patients undergoing thoracotomy lobectomy. Thoracoscopic techniques do not seem to compromise these measures of outcome after lobectomy.

Comparative safety of endovascular and open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in low-risk male patients.

Journal Journal of Vascular Surgery
Authors Siracuse, Jeffrey J., Heather L. Gill, Ashley R. Graham, Darren B. Schneider, Peter H. Connolly, Art Sedrakyan, and Andrew J. Meltzer
Year Published 2014
Link to Publication

Objective

The prevalence of significant comorbidities among patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has contributed to widespread enthusiasm for endovascular AAA repair (EVAR). However, the advantages of EVAR in patients at low risk for open surgical repair (OSR) remain unclear. The objective of this study was to assess perioperative outcomes of EVAR and OSR in low-risk patients.

Methods

Patients undergoing EVAR and OSR for infrarenal AAAs were identified in the 2007 to 2010 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data sets. AAA-specific risk stratification, by the Medicare aneurysm scoring system, was used to create matched low-risk (score <3) cohorts. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were assessed by crude comparisons of matched groups and regression models.

Results

Of 11,753 elective patients undergoing EVAR, 4339 (37%) were deemed low risk (score <3). A matched cohort of 1576 low-risk patients was developed from a total of 3804 (41%) undergoing OSR. The low-risk cohorts included only male patients and those <75 years of age, without significant cardiac, pulmonary, or vascular comorbidities. Mean age in both low-risk groups was 67 ± 6 years (P = NS). EVAR patients had higher rates of obesity (40% vs 33%; P < .001), diabetes (16% vs 13%; P = .005), history of cardiac intervention (24% vs 19%; P < .001), cardiac surgery (23% vs 20%; P = .02), steroid use (4% vs 2%; P = .002), and bleeding disorders/anticoagulation (9% vs 6%; P = .001) compared with OSR patients. There were no other differences between the matched cohorts. EVAR was associated with reduced 30-day mortality (0.5% vs 1.5%; P < .01) and reduced rates of major complications, including the following: sepsis (0.7% vs 3.2%; P < .01), unplanned intubation (1.0 vs 5.4%; P < .001), pneumonia (0.8% vs 6.1%; P < .001), acute renal failure (0.4% vs 2.7%; P < .001), and early reoperation (3.7% vs 6.0%; P < .001). Furthermore, EVAR was associated with reduced perioperative morbidity across organ systems, including venous thromboembolism (0.1% vs 0.3%; P = .001), transfusion requirement of more than 4 units (2.0% vs 13.0%; P < .001), cardiac arrest (0.2 vs 0.8; P = .001), neurologic deficits (0.2% vs 0.5%; P = .032), and urinary tract infections (1.2% vs 2%; P = .02).

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate that even among those male patients at low risk for OSR on the basis of comorbidities, EVAR is associated with reduced perioperative mortality and major complications. Whereas clinical decisions must account for safety and long-term effectiveness, the short-term benefit of EVAR is evident even among male patients at the lowest risk for OSR.

Comparative effectiveness of drug-eluting stents on long-term outcomes in elderly patients treated for in-stent restenosis: a report from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry.

Journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular interventions
Authors Kutcher, Michael A.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Rao, Sunil V.; Dai, David; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Mustafa, Nowwar; Sedrakayan, Art
Year Published 2014
Link to Publication

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the long-term outcomes of elderly patients who had in-stent restenosis (ISR) treated with drug-eluting stents (DES) compared with other treatment strategies.

BACKGROUND:

Elderly patients with ISR represent a vulnerable group of which little is known regarding the safety and efficacy of repeat percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

METHODS:

We analyzed patients ≥ 65 years of age who underwent PCI for ISR in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry(®) from 2004 to 2008. Death, myocardial infarction (MI), revascularization, stroke, and bleeding were assessed for up to 30 months by a linkage with Medicare rehospitalization claims.

RESULTS:

Of 43,679 linked patients, 30,012 were treated with DES, 8,277 with balloon angioplasty (BA), and 4,917 with bare metal stents (BMS). Compared with BMS, DES use was associated with a lower propensity score-matched (PM) risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.80, P < 0.001), MI (HR 0.81; 95% CI 0.70-0.93, P = 0.003), and revascularization (HR 0.90; 95% CI 0.82-1.00, P = 0.055). Compared with BA, DES use was associated with a lower PM risk of death (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.76-0.89, P < 0.001) and revascularization (HR 0.86; 95% CI 0.80-0.93, P < 0.001), but no statistically significant difference across other endpoints. There were no significant differences in long-term outcomes for BA compared with BMS.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was lower mortality and reduced risk for MI, revascularization, and stroke, but a similar rate of bleeding with DES compared with other modalities. Our results indicate that DES use is a comparatively effective strategy to treat elderly patients with ISR.