IDEAL Conference 2017

The IDEAL Collaboration

Idea, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term Follow-up, Improving the Quality of Research in Surgery

Research, Regulation, and Reimbursement in Surgery and Technologies

  • Learn about the latest developments in the scientific methodology for investigating new surgeries and medical devices
  • Hear internationally renowned surgical researchers discussing innovation and evaluation in multiple clinical areas
  • Present your research on innovations in surgery and therapeutic technology to an international audience of clinicians, scientists, manufacturers and regulators
  • Learn about IDEAL pathways for innovation in medicine and perspectives on regulation and reimbursement
  • IDEAL as EBM framework in surgery, device innovation and interventional care

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Mesh use in surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

Journal BMJ
Authors Barber, Matthew D
Year Published 2015
Link to article

Introduction

By age 80 years, one in eight women will undergo surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP), a condition where the pelvic organs descend into or through the vaginal canal. In the United States, about 80% of procedures are performed transvaginally. Building on the experience of general surgeons and the treatment of abdominal hernias, pelvic surgeons began using synthetic mesh to augment prolapse repairs to reduce prolapse recurrence seen frequently after native tissue (non-mesh) repairs. However, use of synthetic mesh also results in increased adverse events, in some cases with serious consequences

Long term survival with thoracoscopic versus open lobectomy: propensity matched comparative analysis using SEER-Medicare database

Journal BMJ
Authors
Subroto Paul,  Abby J Isaacs,  Tom Treasure, Nasser K Altorki, Art Sedrakyan
Year Published 2014
Link to Publication

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare long term survival after minimally invasive lobectomy and thoracotomy lobectomy.

DESIGN:

Propensity matched analysis.

SETTING:

Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database.

PARTICIPANTS:

All patients with lung cancer from 2007 to 2009 undergoing lobectomy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Influence of less invasive thoracoscopic surgery on overall survival, disease-free survival, and cancer specific survival.

RESULTS:

From 2007 to 2009, 6008 patients undergoing lobectomy were identified (n=4715 (78%) thoracotomy). The median age of the entire cohort was 74 (interquartile range 70-78) years. The median length of follow-up for entire group was 40 months. In a matched analysis of 1195 patients in each treatment category, no statistical differences in three year overall survival, disease-free survival, or cancer specific survival were found between the groups (overall survival: 70.6% v 68.1%, P=0.55; disease-free survival: 86.2% v 85.4%, P=0.46; cancer specific survival: 92% v 89.5%, P=0.05).

CONCLUSION:

This propensity matched analysis showed that patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy had similar overall, cancer specific, and disease-free survival compared with patients undergoing thoracotomy lobectomy. Thoracoscopic techniques do not seem to compromise these measures of outcome after lobectomy.